video game, addiction

The World Health Organization (WHO) includes a new disorder called ‘gaming disorder’, a disorder based on addictive behavior regarding video games.

For someone be diagnosed with gaming disorder, they must be excessively playing video games for at least a year. Playing a lot of video games isn’t the only symptom, the behavior has to impair one’s personal, family, education, occupation, professional, social, emotional, physical or mental life and health.

(This follows most differences between abuse and addiction, i.e. playing a lot of video games might be considered abuse, but addiction is when the action becomes damaging).

There is a lot of published research regarding the positive impact of video games. The American Psychological Associated noted that ‘action’ video games help boost individual’s ability of memory, perception, navigation, direction and logic. Academic and ‘Shooter’ video games in particular, those where gun handling are involved, enhance those skillsets as well.

Research published in 2013 found that video games can increase motivation, effort and cognitive ability in players, especially games which feature multiple levels and long-term goals. Forbes explained that video games thus draw a similarity to hobbies such as sports, arts and extra-curriculars.

Perhaps the largest lesson is that there are potential negative consequences and problems associated with most things in life. Because truly most things can lend themselves in becoming addictive. There’s always an importance in moderate use and taking in a vast more of benefits then consequences.

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